Graph Databases introduces graphs and graph databases to
technology enthusiasts, developers, and database architects.

Graph Databases, published by O’Reilly Media, discusses the problems that are well aligned with graph databases, with examples drawn from practical, real-world use cases. This book also looks at the ecosystem of complementary technologies, highlighting what differentiates graph databases from other database technologies, both relational and NOSQL.

Graph Databases is written by Ian Robinson, Jim Webber, and Emil Eifrém, graph experts and enthusiasts at Neo Technology, creators of Neo4j, the world’s leading graph database.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction
What is a Graph?
A High-Level View of the Graph Space
The Power of Graph Databases
2. Options for Storing Connected Data
Relational Databases Lack Relationships
NOSQL Databases Also Lack Relationships
Graph Databases Embrace Relationships
3. Data Modeling with Graphs
Models and Graphs
The Property Graph Model
Querying Graph: Introduction to Cypher
Comparison of Relational and Graph Modeling
Cross-Domain Models
Common Modeling Pitfalls
Avoiding Anti-Patterns
4. Building a Graph Database Application
Data Modeling
Application Architecture
Testing
Capacity Planning
5. Graphs in the Real World
Why Organizations Choose Graph Databases
Common Use Cases
Real-World Examples
6. Graph Database Internals
Native Graph Processing
Native Graph Storage
Programmatic APIs
Nonfunctional Characteristics
7. Predictive Analysis with Graph Theory
Depth- and Breadth- First Search
Path-Finding with Dijkstra’s Algorithm
The A* Algorithm
Graph Theory and Predictive Modeling
Local Bridges

This exclusive early release of Graph Databases, published by O’Reilly Media, is compliments of Neo Technology, creators of Neo4j. Taking advantage of this special offer will get you started with graph databases now — long before the official book’s release.

Purchase the Print Version

Order Print Version

Errata for Graph Databases

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84 comments on “

  1. Peter Whitfield on said:

    Have tried this twice and not received any emails (spam or otherwise).

    I’d appreciate this being fixed as giving you marketing details without getting anything in return doesn’t encourage me to considerer your products.

    Thanks!

    • Peter Whitfield on said:

      For the record, Aileen from Neotechnology responded to my comment within 60 minutes and got me the link.

      Thanks for keeping an eye on the comments and responding so quickly – confidence restored :-)

  2. Lee Ravenberg on said:

    Hello and thanks for the free e-book. I am really curious about this technology.

  3. Atish Lahiri on said:

    Thank you for making this excellent book on a little-understood yet very powerful technology available for free.

  4. Luciano Borges on said:

    Where can I find the Errata?
    The figure 3-1, is the direction of the arrow wrong?

  5. Thank you so much. Would it be possible for someone to point me towards resources for using graph db with python. Thank you.

  6. Ernesto on said:

    Thanks for this!

  7. Ajit De Silva on said:

    Thank you very much for providing this ebook free of charge. I have seen Neo4J but never cared to take a closer look until I watched a presentation in Infoq.

  8. thank you so much

  9. Zhang xiaofei on said:

    Thanks very much.

  10. Ashok Raj A on said:

    Thank you, that was really cool!!

  11. Roger Bond on said:

    First, thanks a lot for giving this book for free. Second, can you make the e-book available in Kindle format? PDFs are hard to read on small screens (such as tablets or e-book readers).

  12. Adrian Kałuziński on said:

    Really thank You for making this sensational knowledge available for free!

  13. Vishwakarma on said:

    Thanks, awesome work

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Neo4j 2.0 – Eine Graphdatenbank für alle
Michael Hunger Das einzige deutsche Buch zu Neo4j, umfassend und aktuell für Version 2.0. Gratis E-Book zum Download
Jetzt reinschauen »
Ian Robinson’s Blog: Running the Graph Databases Book Examples
The current version of Neo4j has two different types of index: named indexes and automatic indexes. The Cypher query examples throughout the Graph Databases book use named indexes.
There’s a problem, however: data created using a Cypher CREATE statement won’t be indexed in a named index. This has led to some confusion for anyone wanting to code along with the examples: if you use the CREATE statements as published, the query examples won’t work.

Read the full blog here

Ian Robinson is the Director of Customer Success for Neo Technology, the company behind Neo4j. He is a co-author of REST in Practice (O’Reilly) and a contributor to the forthcoming REST: From Research to Practice (Springer) and Service Design Patterns (Addison-Wesley).